The Beatles' 'Sgt. Pepper's' Anniversary Editions Reveal Wonders

In 2006, the Beatles coaxed producer George Martin out of retirement to remix and rearrange several of their iconic songs for Cirque du Soleil's Las Vegas stage production Love. Martin, though, had a worry: At age 80 his hearing had turned difficult, and so he brought in a collaborator: his son Giles.

Now, the surviving band members and their legatees have authorized the reconsideration of a major canonical work: Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, originally released 50 years ago on June 1st, 1967, in England, and the following day in the U.S.

The new Pepper comes in various packages: single and double CDs, a deluxe box of four CDs and two DVDs (containing videos and 5.1 surround mixes of the original album), as well as a double LP that, like most versions here, includes several of the album's original developing and alternate tracks.

All editions feature a stereo remix by Giles Martin

With Abbey Road audio engineer Sam Okell.

 

Giles Martin reveals considerable new wonders – particularly in his stereo remix of the original album (which appears in all the new editions, and as a standalone disc and digital download). The remix, in fact, provides a long overdue epiphany. Martin observes in his liner notes: "The original Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band was primarily mixed as a mono album. All care and attention were applied to the mono LP, with the Beatles present for all the mixes. ... Almost as an afterthought, the stereo album was mixed very quickly without the Beatles at the sessions. Yet it is the stereo album that most people listen to today." In other words, popular music's most elaborate and intricate creation – and one that helped end the mono era – wasn't made to be heard in stereo. 

Some songs arguably benefit from their fundamental, pre-effects treatment: "Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite!" is spookier in its Take 4 version, and much warmer in Take 7, with McCartney's pumping bass steps and Ringo's razor-sharp cymbal accents. Similarly, newly released takes of "With a Little Help From My Friends," "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds," "Lovely Rita" and "Fixing a Hole" demonstrate that before curlicues and overdubs were added there was still a quartet sensibility at the heart of most of this music (The Beatles never would have made this music had they kept touring, but contrary any claims, they could have effectively played almost everything here live and stripped.) You especially feel the band as a tight unit in "Getting Better," "Good Morning Good Morning" and the blazing "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (Reprise)." 

 

Thanks to Giles Martin...

We can hear the Beatles' apogee as it was always meant to be heard.

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